Per the Tangent style guide candidates are listed alphabetically by last name.
Winners are denoted with (w).

U.S. Presidential Electors

Joe Biden (D)
Electors: 306 (w)

Arizona (11)
California (55)
Colorado (9)
Connecticut (7)
Delaware (3)
D.C. (3)
Georgia (16)
Hawaii (4)
Illinois (20)
Maine (3) (split)
Maryland (10)
Massachusetts (11)
Michigan (16)
Minnesota (10)
Nebraska (1) (split)
Nevada (6)
New Hampshire (4)
New Jersey (14)
New Mexico (5)
New York (29)
Oregon (7)
Pennsylvania (20)
Rhode Island (4)
Vermont (3)
Virginia (13)
Washington (12)
Wisconsin (10)

Donald Trump (R)
Electors: 232

Alabama (9)
Alaska (3)
Arkansas (6)
Florida (29)
Idaho (4)
Indiana (11)
Iowa (6)
Kansas (6)
Kentucky (8)
Louisiana (8)
Maine (1) (split)
Mississippi (6)
Missouri (10)
Montana (3)
Nebraska (4) (split)
North Carolina (15)
North Dakota (3)
Ohio (18)
Oklahoma (7)
South Carolina (9)
South Dakota (3)
Tennessee (11)
Texas (38)
Utah (6)
West Virginia (5)
Wyoming (3)

Ballot Races

U.S. President (VA)
Joe Biden (D):54.11% (w)
Jo Jorgensen (L):1.45%
Donald Trump (R):44.00%
Other:0.44%
U.S. Senate, VA
Daniel Gade (R):43.91%
Mark Warner (D):55.99% (w)
Other:0.10%
U.S. House, VA-10th
Aliscia Andrews (R):43.37%
Jennifer Wexton (D):56.51% (w)
Other:0.12%

Ballot Issues

VA Redistricting Amend.
Yes:65.69% (w)
No:34.31%
VA Veteran Tax Amend.
Yes:85.99% (w)
No:14.01%
Loudoun School Bonds
Yes:68.87% (w)
No:31.13%
Loudoun Pub. Safety Bonds
Yes:77.20% (w)
No:22.80%
Loudoun Parks & Rec. Bonds
Yes:68.94% (w)
No:31.06%
Loudoun Transp. Bonds
Yes:76.84% (w)
No:23.16%
  • November 3, 2020, 6:30 p.m.: Off on a Tangent live election coverage begins!
    • Polls in Virginia are scheduled to close at 7:00 p.m. Anybody already in line at that time is permitted to vote.
    • I’m providing live returns in each election I am following. I call winners using a proprietary method that incorporates actual published results, exit polling data, media calls, and more. Because conditions are so unusual this year, I will be more conservative than usual about state calls in the presidential race.
    • Live coverage continues until all of the races I’m following are called, or 1:00 a.m. ET, with additional updates in the following days (weeks?) as time permits.
  • 6:38 p.m.: Polls are scheduled to close in six states at 7:00 p.m.: Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, South Carolina, Virginia, and Vermont. Usually, anybody in line at the time the polls close is allowed to vote.
  • 7:00 p.m.: Let the fun begin.
  • 7:07 p.m.: Some state calls are in; nothing very interesting yet. Some Virginia returns are starting to come in from the Virginia Department of Elections (in record time!).
  • 7:22 p.m.: Polls are scheduled to close in three states at 7:30 p.m.: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. Among those that are already closed, Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia remain too close to call.
  • 7:46 p.m.: There are some serious anomalies right now in the Virginia results being published by the Department of Elections . . . for example, 98 of the 99 precincts in Loudoun County are supposedly “reported” but many of the precincts recorded zero votes.
  • 7:47 p.m.: Tangent call: Virginia’s thirteen electoral votes go to former Vice President Joe Biden (D).
  • 7:57 p.m.: Polls are scheduled to close in sixteen states and the District of Columbia at 8:00 p.m.: Alabama, Connecticut, D.C., Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Tennessee.
  • 8:13 p.m.: Tangent call: Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) has been reelected.
  • 8:24 p.m.: Polls are scheduled to close in one state at 8:30 p.m.: Arkansas. Among those that have already closed, the presidential race is still too close to call in Florida, Georgia, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.
  • 8:33 p.m.: The anomalies in the Virginia results, at least in Loudoun County, seem to have been mostly worked out . . . but I’m holding off on any calls on the local races and ballot issues until I am more comfortable with the stability and accuracy of the numbers.
  • 8:44 p.m.: Polls are scheduled to close in fourteen states at 9:00 p.m.: Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Among those that have already closed, the presidential race is still too close to call in eight states: Florida, Georgia, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.
  • 9:21 p.m.: Some media outlets are beginning to report that they expect the Democratic Party to maintain a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives.
  • 9:25 p.m.: Tangent call: Virginia’s Disabled Veteran Tax Exemption Amendment (Question 2) has passed.
  • 9:57 p.m.: Polls are scheduled to close in four states on 10:00 p.m.: Iowa, Montana, Nevada, and Utah. Among those that have already closed, the presidential race is still too close to call in fourteen states: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska (2), New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Wisconsin. Three of Nebraska’s electors are called and two remain two close to call.
  • 10:15 p.m.: I have been asked about how Virginia has been called for Biden and Warner even though the returns thus far show Trump and Gade ahead.
    • The primary driver of my calls for these two races is media calls from across the ideological spectrum.
    • Because Virginia reports early and absentee votes in county- or city-wide ‘phantom’ precincts, and because there were a ton of those votes this year, the “precincts reporting” value does not accurately reflect the percentage of votes that have been counted.
    • The last handful of precincts getting added to the results will likely have huge numbers of votes and will have a very different slant than the in-person votes from the normal precincts.
    • In other words, I expect the numbers to keep looking ‘wrong’ until the early and absentee ballots are added to the state returns. So far, I have no reason to reconsider those calls.
  • 10:18 p.m.: Tangent call: The Loudoun County bond referendums for schools, public safety, parks and recreation, and transportation have all passed.
  • 10:30 p.m.: Tangent call: Representative Jennifer Wexton (D-VA 10th) has been reelected.
  • 10:40 p.m.: Nothing very interesting so far. None of the real swing states have been called yet. I am noticing that most of the major media outlets are being very cautious about making calls . . . which is probably smart. Fox News seems to be calling things roughly the ‘normal’ way, while CNN, ABC, and others are waiting until they’re really, really, really sure before calling things.
  • 11:07 p.m. (replaces a previously posted update which was in error and has been removed): Polls were scheduled to close in five states at 11:00 p.m.: California, Hawaii, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Among those that have already closed, the presidential race is still too close to call in fourteen states: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Wisconsin. Additionally, three of Nebraska’s electors are called and two remain two close to call.
  • 11:32 p.m.: Fox News Channel has called Florida for Trump and Arizona for Biden, both of which are ‘swing states’ in my estimation. Other outlets have not joined Fox yet, and I am not yet prepared to call these states either.
  • 11:45 p.m.: Polls are closed in every state except Alaska, which is scheduled to close its polls at 1:00 a.m. ET. Races are still too close to call in fifteen states: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin. Additionally, three of Nebraska’s electors are called and two remain two close to call.
  • November 4, 2020, 12:36 a.m.: A lot of states have been called, but so far I am not able to call any of the real swing states. The race could still go either way. I think Biden is probably still favored, but Trump’s odds have improved from where I thought they were before results started coming in.
  • 12:39 a.m.: Almost as soon as I said I couldn’t call any of the real swing states yet, more data came in and I was able to call Florida for Trump. Otherwise, my previous update stands.
  • 12:41 a.m.: Tangent call: Virginia’s Redistricting Commission Amendment (Question 1) has passed.
  • 1:03 a.m.: Polls are now scheduled to have been closed in all fifty states (and the District of Columbia). All of the races I am following in Virginia have been called, but the national presidential race remains too close to call.
  • 2:00 a.m.: I am going to conclude live coverage for the night, and will pick up again in the morning.
    • Only the presidential race remains too close to call. Biden currently holds a 224-213 electoral lead over Trump.
    • Nine states, with a total of 101 electoral votes, remain too close to call: Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
  • 12:29 p.m.: Some updates:
    • More Virginia results have come in since I signed off (as expected). The state and local returns are now approaching their final counts.
    • No big surprises, though it’s looking like Daniel Gade (R) slightly underperformed my expectations in the U.S. Senate race and the redistricting commission amendment slightly overperformed my expectations.
    • I was able to make a couple more state calls in the national presidential race, but it remains too close to call. Biden currently holds a 238-213 electoral lead over Trump.
  • 12:45 p.m.: Five precincts in Virginia have not yet reported: Three in Hopewell City, one in New Kent County, and one in Spotsylvania County.
  • 12:52 p.m.: Preliminary information seems to indicate that national turnout was the highest in over a century—around 67% of eligible voters.
  • 1:50 p.m.: Although no major media outlets are declaring it outright, it now seems very likely that the Republican Party will maintain a majority in the U.S. Senate. It will probably be a narrower majority than it was before though.
  • 2:37 p.m.: What about Alaska?
    • It is all but certain that Alaska’s three electors will go to Trump, and Trump is indeed holding a strong lead in the returns so far, but Alaska has not yet added absentee votes to its results.
    • Since this election has an unusually high number of absentee votes, and in many states they have slanted heavily toward Biden, I am not yet prepared to call the state (nor, it seems, are any of the major media outlets).
  • 4:07 p.m.: Where things stand now:
    • Biden holds a 248-214 electoral lead over Trump. Six states with a total of 76 electors remain too close to call: Alaska, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania.
    • Biden is currently favored to win Michigan (16). Trump is currently favored to win Alaska (3), Georgia (16), North Carolina (15), and Pennsylvania (20). If their respective leads hold, this would leave the race with a narrow 268-264 lead for Trump, and one last state deciding the winner: Nevada (6).
    • In Nevada, Biden is slightly ahead. It’s close enough that anything can happen, but the most likely outcome is that Biden widens his margin and wins the state.
    • All in all, if I was betting money on the final outcome, I’d put the final number at 270-268 for Biden . . . which would be the narrowest possible win. But a lot can still change, so if you’re betting I don’t recommend betting very much.
    • Another scenario is that Trump manages to make up his deficit in Nevada and gets those 6 electors. That would put the final number at 274-264 for Trump.
    • Of course, this all assumes that the candidates leading in the other yet-uncalled states all maintain their leads . . . which is likely but not assured. If, for example, Trump loses Pennsylvania, that changes everything I’ve said here. That’s why we’re saying it’s still too close to call!
  • 4:49 p.m.: Three precincts in Virginia have not yet reported: the Ward 7 precinct in Hopewell City, the central absentee precinct in New Kent County, and the central absentee precinct in Spotsylvania County.
  • 8:44 p.m.: There are still two Virginia precincts not yet reported: the Ward 7 precinct in Hopewell City and the central absentee precinct in New Kent County. In the national race, we’re expecting new results from Georgia within the next hour which may (cross your fingers) give me enough data to make a call there.
  • 8:55 p.m.: It now seems almost certain that 2020 voter turnout (percentage of registered voters actually casting ballots) was the highest in 120 years.
  • 9:41 p.m.: Final updates for the evening:
    • I won’t be making any more calls today. Georgia’s new information doesn’t change my view that Trump is favored to win the state, but it is still too close to call and that could change.
    • The presidential race remains too close to call. Biden currently has a 264-216 lead, which means that if he wins just one more uncalled state, he will win.
    • Five states, with a total of 60 electoral votes, remain too close to call: Alaska, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania.
    • It is disappointing that some states have election systems that don’t allow early counting of early and absentee ballots, or allow ballots to be counted even if they arrive after election day. If you live in one of the states that is still counting, please demand that your state officials fix this for next time. In modern times, a near-final count of a state’s ballots should never take more than twenty-four hours from the closing of the polls.
  • November 5, 2020, 10:35 a.m.: Good morning. Nothing has changed since last night. A couple quick thoughts:
    • Trump needs to shut up. I mean, that’s the nicest way I can possibly say this. Let the states complete their counts.
    • There is sometimes some funny business in the recounts, and almost always on the Democratic side, so it makes sense to keep a close eye on that sort of thing . . . but there is no credible evidence of significant irregularities in any state at this point.
    • Citizens of the states that are still counting really need to demand that their governments do better. As I said last night, “In modern times, a near-final count of a state’s ballots should never take more than twenty-four hours from the closing of the polls.” States should allow early counting of mail-in and early ballots, and should not accept ballots that arrive after election day. Demand that your governments adopt these policies.
    • To be clear, election workers are working very hard in every state. Those in the late counting states are victims of poor policy imposed on them by their state legislatures.
  • 1:15 p.m.: Missing Virginia precincts update:
    • Only one laggard precinct in one jurisdiction remains in Virginia’s presidential and U.S. Senate results:
      • Hopewell City (Ward 7 precinct).
    • There are twelve laggard precincts in eight jurisdictions for the statewide ballot issues:
      • Accomack County (central absentee precinct)
      • Albemarle County (Crozet precinct)
      • Middlesex County (central absentee and Wilton precincts)
      • New Kent County (central absentee precinct)
      • Norfolk City (Lafayette-Winona and Bayview precincts)
      • Prince William County (central absentee and Piney Branch precincts)
      • Richmond City (central absentee precinct)
      • Suffolk City (Booker T. Washington precinct)
      • Virginia Beach City (Baker precinct)
    • I have no idea how or why these precincts have reported in some races but not others.
  • 2:47 p.m.: About Arizona. . . .
    • Arizona was called on election night for Biden by Fox News. The Associated Press also called it later in the evening (after I had signed off). I called it for Biden on Wednesday morning, based in large part on those media calls, which are from two decision desks at outlets with differing ideological biases.
    • All the other major media decision desks still have Arizona as too close to call. Some notable figures, including Nate Silver at FiveThirtyEight, say that the calls by Fox and AP were, and remain, premature. The Trump campaign also disputes that Arizona has gone for Biden.
    • I agree in retrospect that the original media calls were too early. For my own part, I should have waited until more results (or more independent media calls) were in before making my call in Arizona.
    • I have reevaluated the Arizona race, and the data still strongly favors a Biden win. To close the gap, Trump would need to win about 58% of the votes not yet counted. The call stands.
  • 4:27 p.m.: Five states remain too close to call: Alaska, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. (See my earlier note about Arizona.)
    • Alaska (3): Very likely to go for Trump, but because no early or absentee votes have been counted yet it’s impossible to make a formal call.
    • Georgia (16): Very close. Trump has a narrow lead, but it is shrinking as more early and absentee ballots are counted. It really could go either way.
    • Nevada (6): Biden leads here by about as many votes as Trump leads in Georgia, and late counts are adding to his margin. Biden is favored to score a narrow win.
    • North Carolina (15): Trump is ahead by a significant margin, and though it will probably narrow Trump is still favored for a narrow win.
    • Pennsylvania (20): Trump is still ahead but his lead is shrinking with late counts from early and absentee ballots in pro-Biden areas. I think Trump is still slightly favored to win, but I wouldn’t bet on it.
  • 4:30 p.m.: All of Virginia’s precincts are now reported in the presidential and U.S. Senate races. There are still a number of laggard precincts in the statewide ballot issue results.
  • November 6, 2020, 9:49 a.m.: No new changes in my map, but there have been some developments overnight. First, it appears that Biden has pulled ahead in the counts in Georgia and Pennsylvania. Second, Decision Desk HQ has become the first major media decision desk to call Pennsylvania, and thus the whole election, for Biden.
  • 10:20 a.m.: It’s time for another Virginia laggard precinct report. All precincts for president and U.S. Senate are in, but there are a bunch still outstanding for the statewide ballot issues.
    • Accomack County (central absentee precinct)
    • Albemarle County (Crozet precinct)
    • Middlesex County (central absentee and Wilton precincts)
    • Norfolk City (Lafayette-Winona and Bayview precincts)
    • Prince William County (central absentee, Buckland Mills, Burke-Nickens, Piney Branch, Penn, Triangle, and King precincts)
    • Richmond City (central absentee precinct)
    • Suffolk City (Booker T. Washington precinct)
  • 3:35 p.m.: Votes are trickling in at a painfully slow pace in the remaining states. It’s hard to predict when the threshold for making a call will be reached. I’m guessing that Nevada will be the first ‘callable’ state of those remaining, and Biden is still favored there. By my count, just one more state for Biden gives him the presidency . . . which is now by far the most likely outcome.
  • November 7, 2020, 11:52 a.m.: Many media outlets have just projected that Biden has won the presidency. I am not yet prepared to make a call, but I am expecting to be able to make one soon.
  • 12:17 p.m.: Tangent call: Former Vice President Joe Biden (D) has been elected President of the United States with at least 270 electoral votes.
  • 12:23 p.m.: Many media outlets have called Pennsylvania for Biden, but are holding out on both Arizona and Nevada. This is bizarre. The math strongly favors Biden in all three, but there are enough irregularities in Pennsylvania that it makes sense to be more cautious there. There is no reason whatsoever, however, for any outlet not to call Arizona (days ago) or Nevada (today).
  • 12:30 p.m.: Noted by Nathaniel Rakich at FiveThiryEight: “It was 48 years ago today—Nov. 7, 1972—that Biden won his first election for U.S. Senate. He’s gone from one of the youngest senators ever elected to the oldest president ever elected.”
  • 1:10 p.m.: It’s time for another Virginia laggard precinct report. All precincts for president and U.S. Senate are in, but there are ten still outstanding for the statewide ballot issues.
    • Middlesex County (Wilton precinct)
    • Prince William County (central absentee, Buckland Mills, Burke-Nickens, Piney Branch, Penn, Triangle, and King precincts)
    • Richmond City (central absentee precinct)
    • Suffolk City (Booker T. Washington precinct)
  • 1:46 p.m.: About irregularities. . . .
    • There are always election irregularities. Many are honest mistakes that are found and corrected during the canvassing and verification process. Some, however, are orchestrated by corrupt party machines to try to pad the vote counts for their side. This is especially prevalent in certain dense cities with corrupt, long-established Democratic Party machines.
    • I consider this when I make state calls; I have to be comfortable that the projected margin is great enough that questionable votes, errors, and corruption would not be significant enough to turn the race. I stand by each of my calls. Biden won.
    • Trump partisans are alleging that irregularities amount to a ‘stolen’ race in several states. I’m hearing accusations about Arizona, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Many of these allegations are simply false. Others have merit, and should be investigated, but are not significant enough to call the result into question.
    • The exception is Pennsylvania. There is a reason I have not called it yet. The state has problems with voter fraud (especially in Philadelphia, where Biden ran up his count), there are serious constitutional questions about late ballots, vote count observers have been denied reasonable access, and there are some real abnormalities in the voting patterns (again, especially in Philadelphia . . . possibly legitimate, but strange enough to warrant caution and further evaluation).
    • But Biden wins even without Pennsylvania . . . so it matters, and I won’t make a call until I’m satisfied with its legitimacy, but it doesn’t matter much.
  • 9:38 p.m.: Some very strange behavior from the media decision desks. . . . I don’t know if it means anything, but it’s weird.
    • A lot of them have been very slow to call Arizona and Nevada, both of which have clearly gone for Biden.
    • They have all called Pennsylvania without seriously looking at the irregularities I described earlier.
    • And it’s obvious that Trump has won North Carolina . . . it’s mathematically impossible for Biden to make up the difference . . . yet nobody has called it (except me).
    • Biden won either way, so it doesn’t change the final outcome, but it sure doesn’t help the media’s credibility among careful observers.
  • November 8, 2020, 11:36 p.m.: I have been able to call every state except Alaska.
    • It is mathematically impossible, given the number of outstanding ballots remaining, for Trump to make up the difference in either Georgia or Pennsylvania.
    • The irregularities in Pennsylvania are unlikely to be enough to call the result into question. They should, however, still be investigated and resolved.
    • Alaska, for some bizarre reason, does not count or report its early or absentee votes for a week or more after the election. These are expected to account for about half of the votes in the state. Trump is strongly favored to win there, but there is not enough data available to make a call.
  • November 9, 2020, 9:23 a.m.: Things are winding down. I am going to switch the site out of live blog mode, but will continue to update this post periodically as time permits until all states are called and the Virginia numbers are certified final.
  • 7:28 p.m.: The following laggard precincts in Virginia are still outstanding in the statewide referendums. Come on, guys. Get it together.
    • Middlesex County (Wilton precinct)
    • Prince William County (Buckland Mills, Burke-Nickens, Piney Branch, Penn, Triangle, and King precincts)
    • Richmond City (central absentee precinct)
  • November 10, 2020, 8:32 p.m.: It would be nice if Alaska could hurry up and count their ballots. Same for the remaining laggard precincts here in Virginia’s Prince William County (Buckland Mills, Burke-Nickens, Piney Branch, Penn, Triangle, and King precincts) and Richmond City (central absentee precinct).
  • November 11, 2020, 10:40 a.m.: Today’s election updates:
    • A large number of ballots from Alaska were reported overnight. Several major media outlets have since called it for Trump. After reviewing the numbers, I am doing the same.
    • I have now made a presidential call in each state. The final number (not counting any “faithless electors”) will be 306-232 for Biden. That is the exact same margin by which Trump defeated former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (D) four years ago.
    • I have reevaluated my calls in close states, especially those in which major media outlets have been reluctant to make calls. They hold up and I stand by them. The margins are large enough that it is extremely unlikely for outstanding ballots and recounts to change the outcomes.
    • There is some evidence of fraud in some specific places (as there is in every election) . . . but there is no evidence that it is as widespread as the Trump campaign claims, and I have no reason to believe that any state’s result is seriously in doubt. Fraud claims should, however, be taken seriously and investigated.
    • In Virginia, the only locality that has not yet published its final results is Prince William County . . . four of its precincts are missing in the statewide referendum results and it looks like they haven’t processed their provisional ballots either. Get it together, guys!
    • This post will remain open at least until the Virginia results are certified and published, which will be no sooner than Monday, November 16.
  • November 14, 2020, 7:04 p.m.: A few more updates now that we’re close to wrapping up.
    • In the presidential race, the electoral number from my last update stands: 306-232 for Biden. In electoral percentage terms, that’s about 56.9-43.1%. The popular vote tallies are not yet final, but the Associated Press estimates about 51.0-47.3% for Biden, with the remaining 1.7% split between various minor candidates.
    • The Senate currently stands at 50-48 for the Republicans. Republicans suffered a net loss of one seat. Control of the Senate cannot be determined until after the Georgia runoffs.
    • No candidate achieved a majority in either of Georgia’s Senate races (one general election and one special election), which, under Georgia law, means the outcomes will be decided in a runoff election in January. Democrats would need to win both runoff races to achieve a tie, which would give them an effective majority.
    • The House of Representatives currently stands at 219-205 for the Democrats. Democrats have held their majority, but so far suffered a net loss of seven seats. Twelve seats are not yet called (according to Decision Desk HQ).
  • November 16, 2020, 1:42 p.m.: The Virginia State Board of Elections is meeting to certify the state’s final election results. One locality—Richmond City—has not yet submitted its results to the board, and that is causing some confusion. It sounds like they’re going to defer further discussion until after a scheduled closed session . . . it’s unclear whether the results will actually be certified today.
  • 2:47 p.m.: Presidential, senate, 4th congressional district, and the statewide ballot issue results are not being certified today due to Richmond’s failure to submit the required paperwork. The SBE will reconvene on Wednesday to certify those races. They went ahead and certified the results in all of the other congressional districts.
  • November 18, 2020, 9:19 a.m.: The Virginia State Board of Elections will be meeting at 4:00 p.m. today to certify the presidential, senate, 4th congressional district, and statewide ballot issue results . . . assuming Richmond got their paperwork in.
  • 4: 18 p.m.: This afternoon’s updates:
    • The Virginia State Board of Elections has voted to certify the the state’s results for president, senate, 4th congressional district, and the statewide ballot issues.
    • As soon as the detailed certified results are made available by the state, I will make a final update to the result data on the site to reflect the final, official counts.
    • The last few House of Representatives races are trickling in. It stands at 220-206 for the Democrats. Democrats have held their majority, but so far suffered a net loss of eight seats. Ten seats are not yet called.
    • There have been no changes to the presidential or senate counts reported earlier.
  • November 20, 2020, 11:50 a.m.: The Virginia Department of Elections will be posting the final, certified results in the next few days. I expect to validate and update my posted results within one day after they become available.
  • November 21, 2020, 10:53 p.m.: Final results have been posted by the Virginia Department of Elections. I have incorporated those results here. This completes the Off on a Tangent election coverage for 2020. Thanks for tuning in!