I usually plan to publish my list of the ugliest cars of a given model year in the first quarter of the year. Last year I was late—I finally got it published in July. This year I’m even later. It’s November. It’s barely even still 2021.

Sorry. I’ve been busy. But the tradition cannot die, and I’ll try to do better next year.

There have not been a lot of big changes from last year. The Fiat 500L and the Honda Civic Type R have been discontinued. There has also been a little bit of adjustment to the order as my tastes change and I get more used to certain objectionable car designs. Sometimes something that looks bad at first becomes slightly less bad with time.

The criteria are simple. Cars that are currently sold new in the United States are eligible unless they sell in very low volume or are not sold to the general public. Volume is defined based on my subjective opinion—if I see ’em on the roads, they qualify; if I don’t, they don’t. Vehicles that are only sold for exotic, military, commercial, or special purposes are excluded.

As always, this list is my personal opinion. If you own one of the cars on this list, don’t take it (too) personally.

Election 2021 Results (Final)

Ballot Races
Virginia Governor
Princess Blanding (LP):0.70%
Terry McAuliffe (D):48.64%
Glenn Youngkin (R):50.57%
Other:0.08%
Virginia Lt. Governor
Hala Ayala (D):49.18%
Winsome Sears (R):50.71%
Other:0.12%
Virginia Atty. General
Mark Herring (D):49.55%
Jason Miyares (R):50.36%
Other:0.09%
Virginia House, 87th
Gregory Moulthrop (R):41.44%
Suhas Subramanyam (D):58.42%
Other:0.13%
Ballot Issues
Loudoun School Bonds
Yes:66.54%
No:33.46%
Loudoun Safety Bonds
Yes:82.04%
No:17.96%
Loudoun Transp. Bonds
Yes:76.15%
No:23.85%

I Voted; Final Thoughts

Each year, on the “Tuesday next after the first Monday in the month of November,” I go to my local polling place to vote. This year was no different. My lot is cast. Now I wait ’til evening, when the results start to come in.

On Virginians’ ballots this year are the governor, lieutenant governor, state attorney general, members of the House of Delegates, and various local offices and ballot issues. These are important. In some ways, they are more important than the big-tickets presidential and congressional elections that tend to get a lot more attention. So, if you are an eligible voter, go vote.

But first, take some time and do some research. I encourage you to read my endorsements, which explain why I voted the way I did. But read other peoples’ too. Read the candidates’ websites, watch some of their stump speeches (if you can find them), read opinion articles and editorials, and talk to your friends. And don’t pay too much attention to party lines and hyperbolic ads.

Use your head, get informed, and make your own choices.

Governor of Virginia, 2021

Seal of Virginia
Seal of Virginia

In the open race to serve as Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, former Governor Terry McAuliffe (D-VA) faces Glenn Youngkin (R). One minor candidate, Princess Blanding (Liberation), will also be on the ballot. The Constitution of Virginia prohibits governors from serving multiple consecutive terms, so incumbent Governor Ralph Northam (D-VA) is ineligible for reelection.

The office of governor is established by the Constitution of Virginia, and the office holder’s primary duty is to serve as the chief of the commonwealth’s executive branch of government. The governor must report on the state of the commonwealth to the General Assembly, convene the legislature when a special session is called, ensure that state laws are executed properly, and serve as commander-in-chief of the state militia. Additionally, governors have the power to submit recommendations to the General Assembly, veto bills (in whole or in part with a line-item veto), commute fines and issue pardons, and restore rights to convicted felons.

Virginia governors must be at least thirty years old, citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and have been a resident and registered voter in the commonwealth for five years preceding the date of the election. They are elected to four-year terms and there are no term limits, although governors are prohibited from serving consecutive terms. Virginia is the only state in the United States that does not permit governors to stand for reelection.

Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, 2021

Seal of Virginia
Seal of Virginia

In the open race to serve as the Lieutenant Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Delegate Hala Ayala (D-VA 51st) faces former Delegate Winsome Sears (R-VA 90th). Incumbent Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax (D) is not seeking reelection.

The office of lieutenant governor is established by the Constitution of Virginia, and the office holder’s primary duty is to serve as the president of the Senate of Virginia. The lieutenant governor may vote in the senate only to break ties. In addition, the lieutenant governor is first in the line of gubernatorial succession and would become governor in the event of the governor’s death, resignation, or removal. Because Virginia governors may only serve one consecutive term, the office of lieutenant governor often serves as a “stepping-stone” toward the governor’s mansion.

Virginia lieutenant governors must be at least thirty years old, citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and have been a resident and registered voter in the commonwealth for five years preceding the date of the election. They are elected to four-year terms and there are no term limits.

The Senate of Virginia is made up of senators elected from forty districts across the commonwealth. The Democratic Party holds a narrow majority with twenty-one seats. The Republican Party holds nineteen seats.

Scott Bradford has been putting his opinions on his website since 1995—before most people knew what a website was. He has been a professional web developer in the public- and private-sector for over twenty years. He is an independent constitutional conservative who believes in human rights and limited government, and a Catholic Christian whose beliefs are summarized in the Nicene Creed. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Public Administration from George Mason University. He loves Pink Floyd and can play the bass guitar . . . sort-of. He’s a husband, pet lover, amateur radio operator, and classic AMC/Jeep enthusiast.