Okay, this will be my last car-related post for a while ;-). Despite what I had reported earlier, the dealership was able to get everything set for us on Monday so we were able to drive off the lot in our new 2008 Subaru Outback 2.5i Monday evening. The only missing piece was the bike rack (which just plugs into the trailer hitch receiver) which they expect to get today or tomorrow. Thus, we have to swing by once more to pick that up, hand over the Tribute’s title (since we didn’t bring it Monday), and give them the USAA loan papers.

I have to hand it to Stohlman Subaru of Herndon. They really did a great job of letting us try the car out (they didn’t require the salesman to go on the test drive with us) and jumping through all the paperwork hoops. So far, everything has gone smoother and easier than expected. The car was ready a day earlier than estimated, there were no crazy hidden fees, and the only extra they tried to sell us was Subaru’s extended warranty (it was offered, but not pushed on us by the dealer and the ‘no thanks’ was graciously accepted without argument). The whole process was, dare I say it, painless. If you’re in the market for a Subaru in the DC metro area, check out Stohlman.

The only real quirk so far is with Subaru the company, not the car itself or the dealer. Subaru now offers an iPod connectivity kit but, for some reason, only makes it available on the 2008 Impreza and 2009 Forester. It is not offered for the Outback, Legacy, Tribeca, or 2008 Forester. This is especially bizarre since the part connects to the standard Subaru satellite radio port on the back of the radios for most Subarus made since 2006. A quick Google search reveals that people have successfully installed the part on Outbacks and Legacys and it works perfectly with the stock stereo. So why limit sales to two specific models? It’s a strange marketing move, to say the least.

So anyway, I’ve ordered the part from a parts supplier and will be doing the install myself :-). Why should Impreza/Forester buyers have all the fun?

Scott Bradford has been building web sites and using them to say what he thinks since 1995, which tended to get him in trouble with power-tripping assistant principals at the time. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Public Administration from George Mason University, but has spent most of his career (so far) working on public- and private-sector web sites. He is not a member of any political party, and brands himself an ‘independent constitutional conservative.’ In addition to holding down a day job and blogging about challenging subjects like politics, religion, and technology, Scott is also a devout Catholic, gun-owner, bike rider, and music lover with a wife, two cats, and a dog.